24 hours Startup: Build a Meal Kit Delivery Startup & Mobile App.

Build a startup using Stripe, Google Sheets, Glide & Carrd

Note: This article is part of my toolkit newsletters↗️ where I share resources about building things. Join me :)

As a product builder↗️, I built micro tools to solve my own problems. For example: article tool, event app, portfolio tracker, finance tracker, SaaS tracker, and habit tracker.

I recently built a meal kit delivery startup for my ongoing experiment with fast prototyping. I built both the startup page & mobile app MVP. Here’re my processes & templates to create the functional tech product in 1 day.

1. Getting it right 🙌

One way to “de-risk” new ventures is to test & validate the idea in the market before actually building it.

You don’t want to spend $ on engineering hires early on to build something for 6 months that no one is going to use. Therefore, a minimum viable product (MVP) is your good friend.

An MVP should be viable enough to build it and functional enough for people to use it.

What makes a functional MVP?

  • Functional. A live product with a few initial features that are working, solving problems, and testing for your problem hypothesis. It should be more than just a website.

  • Viable to build. Able to build it fast for idea validation purposes without requiring (insert X amount of angel investment).

  • Traction. Able to gain early users’ traction such as signup, download, checkout, and payment.

  • Testing & feedback. Able to collect data points and user feedbacks to conclude whether the idea will succeed.

2. Startup idea 🥗

As a starting point, I ideated the meal kit startup idea from Blue Apron and HelloFresh

Meal Kit Go is a meal kit delivery service for fitness meal cooking plans that deliver fresh ingredients based on customized meal preferences to your doorstep. 

The startup landing page is designed to test marketing messaging, explain the value proposition, and drive awareness for the mobile app where users can use the actual MVP (browse meals, customize order, checkout).

Try the live demo

Some key features for the MVP

  • List of curated meal recipes

  • Recipe descriptions (calories, fresh ingredients, instructions)

  • Pricing of meal kit subscription plans

  • Customize meal preferences

  • Add to cart & show product details

  • Order form with the delivery address

  • Customer payment via Stripe

3. Tools I used 🔨

There are existing tools that can help you to build a *working* product in hours — not months. Here’s what I used to build the meal kit startup:

Carrd

A simple, lightweight & fully responsive page builder. I use Carrd to build, design, and launch the startup landing page. For prototyping purposes, I love using it because you don’t need a custom domain to publish the site to live.

👉 Copy the mobile app & startup website templates

Glide

A mobile app generator with app-like features. I use Glide to build the mobile app for the meal kit startup where it allows users to sign-in via Google, browse recipes, customize meal plans, and place orders.

Stripe

I integrate Stripe with the Glide app to handle customer checkout and payment processing. It also allows user to enter their home address so we can deliver the meal kit to their doorstep.

Google Sheets

I use Google Sheets to create the mobile app databases and store information such as user registration (i.e. email addresses) and app content (i.e. meal recipes, image assets, subscription pricing, product order details).

Airtable

A spreadsheet hybrid database creation tool. I use it to build the application form on the landing page to collect lead information (i.e. name, email, bio, phone number) and store them as lead database.

4. Building functional features 🚀

One way to think about the initial features for your startup MVP is to map out the user journey. You visualize the action steps that a user would take to accomplish a goal. For example:

Transform the user journey into functional features

Once I map out the user journey, I start to work on the app functionality, design, and marketing messaging for the startup MVP. Here’re some key user steps of the Meal Kit Go startup website and mobile app:

(1) A landing page with mobile responsive design

Build the landing page to include key messaging, explain the meal kit concept, and drive awareness for the mobile app MVP.

👉 Copy the mobile app & startup website templates

(2) Explore recipes and save to favorite list

Users can browse a list of meal recipes, learn more about the recipes (calories, fresh ingredients & cooking instruction) and save to favorite list.

(3) Browse a selection of cooking plans

There’re 3 weekly subscription options. Users can order 2x, 3x or 5x recipes per week and get the meal kit delivered.

(4) Customize order & add to cart

Users can customize their meal preferences based on their fitness goals (bodybuilding, protein meals, weight loss, and smoothies pack). We will curate relevant recipes and customize the meal kit accordingly.

(5) Edit cart, checkout with Stripe

Users should be able to see their cart orders with product description details, checkout, enter their delivery address and pay.

👉 Copy the mobile app & startup website templates

[1] Find me on Personal Site / Twitter / LinkedIn 🔥

[2] In case you miss out, I can send my upcoming toolkit to your inbox — Click here to join my newsletter 💌

In 3 hours: Build a Mobile App (nocode) using Google Sheet & Glide

Using spreadsheets to build an app for virtual events

Note: This article is part of my toolkit newsletters↗️ where I share resources about building things. Join me :)

As a product builder↗️, I built micro tools to solve my own problems. For example: article tool, portfolio tracker, SaaS tracker, habit tracker, and finance tracker

I’m a fan of spreadsheets when it comes to prototyping. Today, I’ll share how I built this mobile app without code with an app template you can use.

1. Ideation stage 💡

Let’s name this app —RemoteConfy. A mobile app for virtual event organizers to manage event info, details, ticket sales, FAQ & customer support.

Users can view event schedules, purchase online tickets and email the organizer.

To begin, I list down the parts I want to build:

  • Overview of event info & details

  • Ticket type, pricing & payment

  • Speakers lineup, profile photo & bio

  • Event schedule, session time and topic

  • List of FAQs

  • Contact customer support

2. Getting started ⚒️

Go to Glide and create a free account. Then, go to Google Sheet and create a new file “virtual event database”. Once you log in and authenticate both accounts:

  • Create a new app in Glide from Google Sheet

  • Select the new spreadsheet file (copy & use this barebone sample)

  • You’ll see the app UI with the output data linked with the spreadsheet

3. Configure your spreadsheet 📊

Glide app will turn your spreadsheet and output the data on mobile UI. In other words, you’ll need to create & update the spreadsheet to populate these data to configure your app.

If you don’t want to start from scratch, you can copy my spreadsheet.

Create new sheets in the same file. Each sheet contains a database (in bracket) we need for the event app:

  • About (featured image, event title, description, links)

  • Speaker (name, company, photo, bio, session topic)

  • Partner (company name, logo)

  • Schedule (session time, topic, speaker name)

  • Tickets (tickets type, price, details, checkout)

  • FAQ (list of questions and answers)

  • Input FAQ (user full name, email & question)

👉 Try the app template (on mobile/web) here

4. Create app pages📱

We’ll need to create 4 separate app pages: About, Schedule, Speaker and FAQ. Each page will link to the relevant sheets & data we created in Step 3. 

Make sure you refresh the database “Reload sheet” in Glide. This will re-sync Glide output with the spreadsheet data you’ve updated.

Add new tabs in Glide

  • Go to “Tabs” on the left sidebar in Glide

  • Add a new tab (or rename), i.e. “About”

  • Point the data “Source” to the “About” sheet

Repeat the above steps for other Tabs (i.e. Schedule, Speaker, FAQ). You’ll need to make sure each Tab points to the right data source in the spreadsheet. For example:

5. Display event details 📆

Let’s build the “About” page. You can include cover image, event title, description, and buttons. Start by clicking “Layout” on the left sidebar in Glide. Style the screen layout using “Details” mode, then:

Add new “Components +”

  • E.g.: Image, Title, Basic Text, Button, Separator, Title, Rich Text (and other elements you see fit)

  • Each component represents a design block that’s linked with data from “About” sheet 

Format each “Component”

  • Let’s format the main event title & description

  • Add a “Title” component from “+” 

  • Point the data source to a sheet column (“event_title_title” “event_title_sub”)

Partially list out speakers and let users click “Show all” in a separate list:

  • Add an “Inline List” component on About page

  • Point the data source to a sheet (“Speaker”)

  • Pull out other Speaker data (name, company, photo)

6. Purchase event tickets 🎟

Continue on the “About” page. Now we want to create a ticket purchase button that links to different ticket orders (General vs. Expert Admission).

Here’re the logical steps and app views when a user clicks on “ticket” button:

  • Sees 2 types of tickets (Select Tickets view)

  • Clicks on the 1st ticket option (General Admission view)

  • Sees a “Purchase ticket” button (General Admission view)

  • Sees an external payment page (ticket checkout)

Add ticket button

  • Add a “Button” component on About page

  • Edit the button “Features”, select “Action” (“Link to screen”)

  • Point the data source to a sheet (“Tickets”)

Show 2 types of the ticket where users can choose from and expand for tickets info & pricing.

  • Style the screen layout using “List” mode

  • Pull out all data source related to tickets info (type, price, details)

Link ticket purchase button using Gumroad as checkout. Make sure you’ve set up Gumroad with General & Expert tickets.

  • On “General Admission” app view, add a “Button” component from “+”

  • Edit the button “Features”, select “Action” (“Open link”)

  • Point the “Target” to “tickets checkout” that contains Gumroad link

You can also use Glide’s built-in checkout, Stripe or PayPal as an alternative.

👉 Try the app template (on mobile/web) here

7. Event schedule ⏰

The schedule page will list out the event agenda and topics. To build the Schedule view, point the data source to the “Schedule” sheet. Here’s how to customize the mobile UI on Glide:

Configure the “Schedule” tab

  • Style the screen layout using “List” mode

  • Pull out data you want to display (topic, time)

Each session will show presentation title, time and speaker. Add these components:

  • “Title” component to include topic title, time and image cover

  • “Rich Text” component and name “SPEAKER”

  • “List Relation” component to link existing speakers database (this won’t work until we do the next step)

“List Relation” to link both Session topics <> Speakers’ topics database

Each session topic corresponds to a speaker who is presenting the topic. You can create a Speakers database (name, bio, topic, headshot) and re-use this database in the Schedule database.

  • Go to “Data” icon on the left sidebar in Glide

  • Go to the “Schedule” tab in the database

  • Add Column+ from the top right corner, edit below settings

👉 Try the app template (on mobile/web) here

8. Email customer support 💁‍♂️

This section can include frequently asked questions such as ticket purchase, refund and so on. To build this page, you can point the data source to the “FAQ” sheet and style the display accordingly.

Users may want to ask additional questions that are not included in the FAQ. Therefore, we can create a contact form for this purpose.

  • Add a “Form Button” component on FAQ page

  • Edit the button “Features”, select “Action” (“Show form”)

  • Point the form button to a data source “Input: FAQ”

  • Create 3 form fields (full name, email & question)

Every time a user submits their questions, the input data will automatically update in this spreadsheet “Input: FAQ”. For example:

👉 Try the app template (on mobile/web) here

[1] Find me on Personal Site / Twitter / LinkedIn 🔥

[2] In case you miss out, I can send my upcoming toolkit to your inbox — Click here to join my newsletter 💌

[3] If you’re feeling generous today, you can buy me a coffee ☕

How I Built a Book Reading Tracker in Notion (with Template)

Keep track your booklist & reading notes in 1 place

Note: This article is part of my toolkit newsletters↗️ where I share resources about building things. Join me :)

As a product builder↗️, I built micro tools to solve my own problems. For example: article tool, portfolio tracker, SaaS tracker, habit tracker, andpersonal finance tracker.

I’ve always been an avid reader and I love reading about startups, business, & mindset. I wanted to be able to track my reading list, notes, and progress. 

Today, I will share my steps on how to create your own book tracker. I’ll also include a Notion template so you can duplicate a copy.

Books I’ve done from 2017 to 2020

1. Starting point 💡

Before this, I used Goodreads to track my reading progress. I also tracked my book notes on a separate Google Doc. However, I wanted a solution that combines both.

✅ To begin, I list down parts I want to build

  • Track reading progress 

  • Record reading notes

  • Sort reading list by category

  • Include a cover image for each book entry

  • Track number of times a book read by date

👉Access my Reading Tracker here

2. Set up Notion 💻

Go to Notion and sign up for a free account.

✅ Getting started

  • Start a new workspace in Notion

  • Name your document “Book Reading Tracker”

  • Create a database by choosing the “Gallery” option

Notion will create sample data in your Gallery. You might want to delete the sample entries including property “Created” and “Tags” per card entries to start from scratch.

3. Create a book entry 📚 

Fill up the book titles in each of the “Untitled” areas. Click the “+ New” button to add a new entry. For example:

👉Access my Reading Tracker here

4. Add a book image 🖼️

Next, add a book cover image for each of these books. This will make your reading tracker visually richer in each of these card displays.

✅ Create an image property

To attach an image in your book entry, go to any card block,

  • Right-click on “Property”

  • Select a Property Type > “Files & Media”

  • Rename the property as “Image”

✅ Embed book image link

  • Google a book cover photo, copy the photo link by Image Address

  • Paste it into your “Image” using “Embed link” option

  • Click “Embed link”

✅ Show book image via Properties

By default, the embedded book image doesn’t show up in the Gallery unless you customize it. To display the book cover image:

  • Go to “…” icon near the top right “New” icon

  • Select “Properties” from the dropdown

  • Click on “Card Preview” and select “Image”

You can also edit your Card size by “Small”, “Medium” or “Large”

5. Create book category 📦 

I love to organize my book list with relevant themes. It helps me to identify a specific knowledge area I’ve studied and what books to read next. In this case, I’ve used tagging.

✅ Add a tagging property

  • Click “+ Add a Property”, right-click on “Property”

  • Select a Property Type > “Multi-Select”

  • Rename the property as “Category”

✅ Create your category tags

  • Go to “Category” field and start typing your category

  • Hit enter to save a tag, create more tags if you want

  • You can also change the color of the tags

You can also enable your Category to display on the Gallery using the Properties settings in Step 3.

6. Track reading progress 📈

I created a “Progress Code” property to track my reading progress. For example, 2019 #07 means the sixth book in the year of 2020. An entry that contains 2 progress codes means it’s been read 2 times.

You can also enable your Progress Code to display on the Gallery using the Properties settings in Step 3.

👉Access my Reading Tracker here

7. Reading date 📅 

Adding a “Done Date” can enhance searchability. For example, I can sort my reading list by the year 2019, 2018 or 2017. You can create a “Date” property to track this parameter:

👉Access my Reading Tracker here

8. Filter & sort 🔍

One way to use this book tracker is to use the filter/sort in Notion. You can search for a specific book based on the parameters we’ve set: book titles, category, progress, done date, etc.

✅ Filter reading list by category

Let’s filter a list of books that are related to the money category,

  • Go to “…” icon near the top right “New” icon

  • Select “Filter” from the dropdown

  • Set: “Category” — “Contains” — “Money”

✅ Sort reading list by category

Let’s clear the Filter and try to Sort the book list by book titles.

  • Go to “…” icon near the top right “New” icon

  • Select “Sort” from the dropdown

  • Set: “Name” — “Descending”

9. Take reading notes 📝 

I take reading notes in the forms of key lessons, framework & inspiration. In this reading tracker, I can simply type my book notes within each book I track:

👉Access my Reading Tracker here

[1] Find me on Personal Site / Twitter / LinkedIn 🔥

[2] In case you miss out, I can send my upcoming toolkit to your inbox — Click here to join my newsletter 💌

[3] If you’re feeling generous today, you can buy me a coffee ☕

I built a Subscription Tracker App in Coda. Here’s my template

Simple app to manage your online subscription in 1 place

Note: This article is part of my toolkit newsletters↗️ where I share resources about building things. Join me :)

As a product builder↗️, I built a lot of micro tools to solve my own problems. Some of these tools are article tool, portfolio tracker, habit tracker, and personal finance tracker.

I subscribed to several online tools which I have no idea when they’re expiring. I wanted to be able to track these subscriptions, even better — to receive mobile notifications when they’re approaching the renewal date.

Today, I will share how I build this subscription tracker in Coda. I’ll also include a template so you can duplicate a copy & live test the app.

1. Ideation stage 💡

Let’s name this app — SubsTrack.it. A subscription tracking app that keeps track of all your monthly subscription purchases.

Users can add a new service, keep track of billing, expiration date & receive a renewal reminder. Users can also access this tracker from both web and mobile platforms.

✅ To begin, I list down the parts I want to build:

  • Add a new service every time I bought a subscription plan

  • Specify the billing term, pricing and expiration date

  • Automatically count down # days left till renewal

  • Review billing history and the total amount I’ve paid

  • Send a renewal reminder in mobile notifications

2. Set up Coda ⚒️

Go to Coda and sign up for a free account.

Coda can easily transform a document into a mobile app. You can also add components into a doc, such as math formula, embeds, automation, alerts, and app integration. It’s almost Zapier-like and Notion-ish.

✅ Getting started

  • Add a “New Doc” in Coda

  • Insert a “New Table” 

  • Name the first table as “Subscription tracking”

✅ Create new sections

We’re going to create separate pages for bills tracking, review billing history, a summary of purchases and a Help page to guide the new users. 

  • On the left panel, click on “+New” > select “Section”

  • Add 4 new Sections: “Track”, “History”, “Summary”, “Help”

  • Add icon to customize your Section name

👉Access this Coda template here

3. Create a tracking table 📈

Let’s work on the table in the “Track” section. I wanted to build a “Master” list to track all my online subscriptions. This list should contain details about the services I purchased.

✅ Set up tracking table

In an empty Table, add new columns horizontally to create your tracking parameters such as:

  • Service Name (Airtable, Coda, Carrd…)

  • Logo (to attach images of service provider)

  • Plan Details (i.e. Free, Beginner, Pro, Enterprise)

  • Billing Term (monthly, yearly…)

  • Pricing ($)

  • End Date (expiration date of the service)

  • Days Till Renewal (number of days till service expiration)

  • Reminder (status of reminder trigger)

  • Paid (to mark services that have been paid)

✅ Format for visual-rich input

By default, each column is set to “Text” format, which means you can only input text details. Since we need to attach images, specify date information, etc., we’re going to format each column with settings below:

  • Service Name (Text)

  • Logo (Image > Image URL)

  • Plan Details (Text)

  • Billing Term (Select list)

  • Pricing (Currency)

  • End Date (Date)

  • Days Till Renewal (Date > Duration)

  • Reminder (Button)

  • Paid (Checkbox)

✅ To format each column:

  • Right-click on each column, i.e. “Logo”

  • Select “Format column” as shown in the previous image

  • Click to expand a list of available formats, select to set

👉Access this Coda template here

4. Count renewal date 📅

I tend to miss out on service expiration emails. They don’t look “urgent” to me probably because the email subject lines are usually in plain text.

I decided to solve this problem by creating a red highlighter when a service is expiring in less than 30 days. It looks like this:

✅ To create an automatic “day counter” in Coda

  • Right-click on the column “Days till Renewal”

  • Scroll down and click “Add formula”

  • Copy and paste the formula below in “Add column formula”

[End Date]- Today()

✅ Create red highlighter

  • Right-click on the column “Days till Renewal”

  • Select “Conditional format”

  • SET FORMAT (Bold) (Red color)

  • APPLY TO (Days till Renewal) only

  • Copy and paste the formula below to trigger red highlighter

[Days till Renewal] >= Duration(1) AND thisRow.[Days till Renewal] <= Duration(30)

5. Send alerts to mobile 📱

Now you’ve created a visual alert (red highlighter) in Step 4. It would be cool to receive mobile alerts when these services are expiring in less than 7 days. The end result looks like this (Alert Sent):

✅ Create ‘Alert Sent’ button

  • Right-click on the column “Reminder”

  • Select “Format column”, set to “Button” (done in Step 3)

  • Customize your alerts with details below

✅ Disable mobile notifications

You probably don’t need alerts when a subscription still has 200 days till renewal. Therefore, you will need to set up a formula to restrict alerts during certain timeframe:

  • Continue the above instructions in Step 5

  • Scroll down to the area “DISABLE IF”

  • Copy and paste the formula below in the “Add conditions to disable button”

[Days till Renewal]>7

✅ Test alerts on mobile

  • Download Coda mobile app via App Store

  • In ‘Track’ table, change the “End Date” closer to 7 days to see changes

  • Push the “Alert Sent” button on the “Reminder” column. This is for testing. Usually, the notification will be sent without any force action

You should be able to see a notification on your mobile with the customized messages:

👉Access this Coda template here

6. Check off paid services 💳

Let’s “de-visible” the subscription you’ve paid. This will create visual feedback and remove distractions on the subscription tracking table:

✅ Create “Paid” checkbox

  • Right-click on the column “Paid”

  • Select “Format column”, set to “Checkbox”

✅ “De-visible” a row of data when “paid” is checked

  • Right-click on the column “Paid”

  • Select “Conditional format”

  • SET FORMAT (*any* light color)

  • APPLY TO (all available boxes, except Paid)

7. Billing history 💳

Let’s work on a separate “History” section (created in Step 2). This section shows your payment history. Instead of building this report from scratch, we’re going to pull data from our “Track” section.

Display list of previous payments

✅ Insert & filter an existing table

  • Go to “History” section, insert a “Table”, select an existing table “Subscription tracking”

  • Go to Filter icon > Show only “Paid” services that have been “Checked”

  • Name this table “Billing history (paid)”

✅ To count and display total of $ paid

  • Add a heading above the “Billing history (paid)” table

  • Insert “Formula” > “New Formula” (from red “+” button on the top panel)

  • Copy and paste the formula below in “Add formula”

sum([Billing history (paid)].Pricing)

👉Access this Coda template here

8. Summary reports 📝

Let’s work on the “Summary” section. This section summarizes your subscription spending overview. We're going to pull data from the same “Subscription tracking” table.

✅ Filter & display in Chart view

  • Insert the “Subscription tracking” Table in “Summary” section

  • Go to Display icon to convert the spreadsheet table into a chart

  • Configure your Summary chart with below settings

✅ To count services subscribed & $ spent

  • Add some texts above the Summary chart

  • Insert “Formula” > “New Formula” (from red “+” button on the top panel)

  • Copy and paste the formula below in “Add formula”

You’re subscribed to 8 services

Sum(Count([Subscription tracking])) 

You’re spending $1,068.35per year

Sum([Subscription tracking].Pricing)

or $89.03per month

Sum([Subscription tracking].Pricing)/12

👉Access this Coda template here

[1] Find me on Personal Site / Twitter / LinkedIn 🔥

[2] In case you miss out, I can send my upcoming toolkit to your inbox — Click here to join my newsletter 💌

[3] If you’re feeling generous today, you can buy me a coffee ☕

How to read 8 books in 1 sentence each? My crazy book summary.

Super-lite book summary for busy people

Note: This article is part of my toolkit newsletters↗️ where I share resources about building things, books & productivity. Join me :)

As a product builder↗️, I love reading books to hunt product ideas, perspective, and inspiration.

I read about startups, business, mindset, and self-development.

Based on the 8 books I’ve read recently, I decided to share my craziest book summary & key lessons that I learn from each of these books:

1. Deep Work 👨‍💻

#Productivity

🖐 Using the habit of deep work and “singleness of task” to master hard things fast and produce quality outcomes or work.

Key lessons:

  • Schedule long-stretches of hours or weeks to focus on getting 1 thing done.

  • To achieve quality outcome, build your work life around craftmanship, flow state & prolonged deep hour.

  • Practice daily shutdown time: no email, no impulsive social checking, no mental replay.

👉Read my previous 17 books summary here

2. The One Minute Salesperson ⏰

#SalesCommunication

🖐 Generate more sales with less work through repeat business from satisfied clients by treating a prospect like a person, not a commodity.

Key lessons:

  • Selling is not a sales skill; it’s a people skill.

  • Identify customer’s needs by asking more questions.

  • Make the prospect feels good about buying a product.

3. Hunch 🚀

#ProductIdea

🖐 A book for aspiring startup founders to leverage intuition for idea discovery, recognize opportunities that others miss, and build something people want.

Key lessons:

  • Ideas worth nothing unless it is adopted and used.

  • Improve your ideas: keep creating, thinking and questioning.

  • Talk to potential users who are facing problems, understand their emotions, and turn insights into solutions.

👉Read my previous 17 books summary here

4. Kaizen for Small Business Startup 💼

#ProjectManagement

🖐 A book for small businesses on how to practice continuous improvement to drive change and innovation using the concept of Kanban, Lean Startup and Project Management.

Key lessons:

  • Train your team to embrace a willingness to surface problems and change.

  • Strive for 1% improvement on a daily basis.

  • Optimize process, declutter and standardize.

5. Rich Dad’s Before You Quit Your Job 💴

#Entrepreneurship

🖐 A list of business building blocks using the BI Triangle concept to build any multi-million dollar business — (1) Cashflow (2) Communication (3) System (4) Legal (5) Product.

Key lessons:

  • Know the difference: Entrepreneurs own businesses that produce income. Self-employed owns a job but they own no assets & no ownership. Employees have a salary job.

  • Don’t cut costs on Legal & Accounting.

  • Hire slow, fire fast. Let go of bad staff to be less expensive.

6. Tao Te Ching 🧠

#Wisdom

🖐A book on the art of living through philosophy that revolves around nothingness; to expect nothing, i.e. you get everything when you want nothing.

Key lessons:

  • Care about other people’s opinion, you’ll become their prisoners.

  • Good artists free themselves from concept and let intuition creates.

  • Colors blind the eyes. Desire wither the heart.

7. The Magic of Believing 🌌

#SubconsciousMind

🖐 Using the science of subconscious mind, power of thoughts, affirmation, and visualization to achieve tangible results in work, personal goals and business.

Key lessons:

  • Practice mental picture: If you can see it in your mind, you can hold it in your hands.

  • Creative thinking + firm beliefs + execution on ideas on sustained & convicted desire will lead to success.

  • Surround yourself with people who have positive energies to help you strengthen your beliefs.

👉Read my previous 17 books summary here

8. The Alchemist 🌟

#Self-Help

🖐 A book about pursuing personal callings and how to deal with fears, doubts and lack of courage.

Key lessons:

  • Find your personal dream, follow signs & intuition, find a mentor if you want to succeed.

  • If you’re capable of achieving what you want, you should let go of the thoughts of uncertainly

  • If you pay attention to the present, you can improve upon it. Improve the “now” and “later” will become easier.

👉Read my previous 17 books summary here

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